Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock

Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock Book Cover Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock
Matthew Quick
Juvenile Fiction
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
2014-07-01
304

In addition to the P-38, there are four gifts, one for each of my friends. I want to say good-bye to them properly. I want to give them each something to remember me by. To let them know I really cared about them and I'm sorry I couldn't be more than I was--that I couldn't stick around--and that what's going to happen today isn't their fault. Today is Leonard Peacock's birthday. It is also the day he will kill his former best friend, and then himself, with his grandfather's P-38 pistol. Maybe one day he'll believe that being different is okay, important even. But not today.

 

Review:

If there is any book that is important to read, it is “Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock” by Matthew Quick.

I feel like I could hit a character limit for reviews simply by listing all of the life lessons to be found in the book, but I will try to keep it at a minimum.  It gives excellent insight into the mind of someone who feels they have nothing left to live for, as well as all of the attempts made at reaching out that go unnoticed by most.  However, it also makes it very clear that someone does care, even though Leonard may not know it at the time.  There is another hugely important issue raised that is very seldom touched on and took quite a bit of bravery to tackle as bluntly as it was, but I don’t want to spoil what happens.  Trust me when I say that it will make you think.

The characters are all very quirky and well-written, which is typically the case in anything written by Matthew Quick, and I really appreciated that Leonard is an extremely flawed character.  All too often books for young adults tend to portray a victim of bullying and/or someone with suicidal tendencies as being a perfect human being.  That is not the case here, nor is it the case with any person on earth.  It makes the entire story even more relatable by keeping it realistic.

The writing flows well, and given its subject matter, it is an incredibly quick read.  However, the story will stay in your mind long after “Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock” ends.

Everyone should read “Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock”.  I know that I will think more carefully about those around me and look for signs of distress, and I hope that others will, as well.

 

Content Warning:

Language, Sexual Situations,  Violence, Suicide, Rape

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *